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CheetahCats
03-31-2011, 09:26 AM
7848

Built and owned by the State of Georgia, the Western & Atlantic Railroad was constructed between 1841-1850. Costing a staggering five million dollars for the time, the Western & Atlantic established itself as an integral link of multiple railroads which connected ports along the Atlantic Ocean to the Mississippi River.

http://home.comcast.net/%7Enumismatica/pwpimages/ChooChooSmall.gif

Given its isolation, the first locomotive for the train had to be literally carted in pieces, delivered piece-meal, and assembled on the tracks of the new railroad line.

Service began four years after construction began, on December 23rd 1842. The inaugral run began at Atlanta [Marthasville], and terminated in Marietta.

At the inception of the Civil War, the Western & Atlantic Railroad had grown to a total of 46 woodburning locomotives. The railroad itself played a key role in the Confederacy, providing key transportation logistics and delivery of materiel for the war effort. Its strategic loss during the Atlanta Campaign dealt a serious blow to the Confederacy, and by some historians' accounts, was a key contributor to the eventual downfall of the South. As with much of the South's key infrastructure, the railroad was heavily damaged during the war.

The line was repaired, and passed through the hands of several railroad conglomerates. Interestingly, during the life of this important railroad, the State of Georgia has continuously held title and simply leased it out. Presently, CSX Transportation possesses a long-term lease for the line from the State of Georgia.

Below please find a recent Western & Atlantic Railroad Note acquired from auction. Denominated at 50 cents, the note is dated May 1862. I estimate it to be in Fine condition. Upon delivery, I will post an updated image.

http://home.comcast.net/%7Enumismatica/pwpimages/50-Cents-May1862-Face.jpg

Thanks,

- Cheetah

(note: I would have preferred posting this in the exonumia section. However, pursuant to the section description, that section is only for coinage but not scrip.)

___________________________
Sources:
Building the Western and Atlantic Railroad (http://ngeorgia.com/ang/Building_the_Western_and_Atlantic_Railroad)
Route of the Western and Atlantic Railroad (http://ngeorgia.com/ang/Route_of_the_Western_and_Atlantic_Railroad)

CheetahCats
03-31-2011, 09:48 AM
In case anyone is wondering, this is the source photo before I animated it:

7849

mmarotta
03-31-2011, 12:51 PM
Fascinating! Thanks for that.

green18
03-31-2011, 06:26 PM
Check out this map........http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/D?gmd:1:./temp/~ammem_4yAI::


And this site in general........http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/gmdhtml/rrhtml/rrhome.html



I love old rail road maps......

CheetahCats
04-02-2011, 06:18 AM
Check out this map........http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/D?gmd:1:./temp/~ammem_4yAI:: (http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/D?gmd:1:./temp/%7Eammem_4yAI::)


And this site in general........http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/gmdhtml/rrhtml/rrhome.html



I love old rail road maps......

Cool. Thanks for the link. I downloaded the images and saved them for future use!

Below please find scanned 50-cent note in hand.

7873

Thanks,

- Cheetah

traci281
04-12-2011, 09:54 PM
LOVE the history behind this. Had no idea about this line and it's right in my area. Thanks for the info!

green18
04-12-2011, 09:58 PM
And welcome to the forum Traci........:)

Treashunt
04-13-2011, 08:36 AM
LOVE the history behind this. Had no idea about this line and it's right in my area. Thanks for the info!


Welcome, Traci, and tell us about yourself!

guy
04-13-2011, 11:57 AM
Up until not long ago (maybe 50 years) they still used coupons like this on passenger service, at least out here. Because many stations were remote there wasn't always a ticket window, so people boarded then purchased tickets. Instead of giving them change they received change coupons kind of like the mentioned one here, and they had to wait to get to a station to exchange them for cash. I think it might have been an old carry-over practice from the train robbing days, and they wanted to get away from carrying cash on the train. Even today, on the transcon Amtrak that runs through town, they don't take cash as payment at all now. I don't know if thats what is pictured above, but thats about how they look.
Guy

CheetahCats
04-13-2011, 02:21 PM
Up until not long ago (maybe 50 years) they still used coupons like this on passenger service, at least out here. Because many stations were remote there wasn't always a ticket window, so people boarded then purchased tickets. Instead of giving them change they received change coupons kind of like the mentioned one here, and they had to wait to get to a station to exchange them for cash. I think it might have been an old carry-over practice from the train robbing days, and they wanted to get away from carrying cash on the train. Even today, on the transcon Amtrak that runs through town, they don't take cash as payment at all now. I don't know if thats what is pictured above, but thats about how they look.
Guy


This explanation sounds entirely plausible given the timeframe and risk of train robberies during the era. Thanks :)

CheetahCats
04-16-2011, 04:55 AM
Below please find a 25-cent note from the same!

8245

Thanks,

- Cheetah

CheetahCats
04-17-2011, 07:10 AM
[Redacted]

The below word is for keyword searches. It makes the footer search on my signature work.
CCArticle

Paddy54
03-26-2012, 09:34 PM
Great Locomotive ChaseMain article: Great Locomotive Chase (http://www.numissociety.com/wiki/Great_Locomotive_Chase)
On the morning of April 12, 1862, the locomotive (http://www.numissociety.com/wiki/Locomotive) General (http://www.numissociety.com/wiki/The_General_(locomotive)) was stopped at Big Shanty, Georgia (http://www.numissociety.com/wiki/Kennesaw,_Georgia) (now Kennesaw) so that the crew and passengers could have breakfast (http://www.numissociety.com/wiki/Breakfast). During this time, James J. Andrews (http://www.numissociety.com/wiki/James_J._Andrews) and his Union (http://www.numissociety.com/wiki/Union_Army) raiders (Andrews Raiders), stole the General. The only damage the raiders did involved cutting telegraph lines and raising rails, although an attempt to burn a covered bridge (http://www.numissociety.com/wiki/Covered_bridge) failed. The train's conductor, William A. Fuller (http://www.numissociety.com/wiki/William_Fuller_(railroad)), chased the General by foot and handcar (http://www.numissociety.com/wiki/Handcar). At Emerson, Georgia (http://www.numissociety.com/wiki/Emerson,_Georgia), Fuller commandeered the Yonah and rode it north to Kingston, Georgia (http://www.numissociety.com/wiki/Kingston,_Georgia). At Kingston, conductor Fuller got the William R. Smith and headed north to Adairsville (http://www.numissociety.com/wiki/Adairsville,_Georgia). The tracks were broken by the raiders two miles (3 km) south of Adairsville and Fuller had to run the two miles on foot.
At Adairsville, Fuller got the locomotive Texas (http://www.numissociety.com/wiki/The_Texas_(locomotive)) and chased the General. While all of this was happening, Andrews' Raiders were cutting the telegraph (http://www.numissociety.com/wiki/Telegraph) wires so no transmissions could go through to Chattanooga. With the Texas chasing the General in reverse, the chase went through Dalton, Georgia (http://www.numissociety.com/wiki/Dalton,_Georgia), and Tunnel Hill, Georgia (http://www.numissociety.com/wiki/Tunnel_Hill,_Georgia).
At milepost (http://www.numissociety.com/wiki/Milepost) 116.3 (north of Ringgold, Georgia (http://www.numissociety.com/wiki/Ringgold,_Georgia)), Andrews' Raiders abandoned the General and scattered from the locomotive just a few miles from Chattanooga. After the chase, Andrews and most of his raiders were caught. After they were found guilty, Andrews and seven members of his party were executed (http://www.numissociety.com/wiki/Execution_(legal)) by hanging (http://www.numissociety.com/wiki/Hanging).
[edit (http://www.numissociety.com/w/index.php?title=Western_and_Atlantic_Railroad&action=edit&section=6)] After the chaseSee also: The General (locomotive) (http://www.numissociety.com/wiki/The_General_(locomotive)), The Texas (locomotive) (http://www.numissociety.com/wiki/The_Texas_(locomotive)), and The Yonah (locomotive) (http://www.numissociety.com/w/index.php?title=The_Yonah_(locomotive)&action=edit&redlink=1)
When the chase was over, both engines returned to service. After the "General"'s service with the W&A was over, she retired to the L&N (http://www.numissociety.com/wiki/L%26N) Union Depot (http://www.numissociety.com/w/index.php?title=Union_Depot(Chattanooga)&action=edit&redlink=1) in Chattanooga. In 1962, 100 years after the chase, the L&N performed work necessary to allow the locomotive to operate under her own power for a series of appearances marking the 100th anniversary of the Andrews Raid. The premier appearance was her run from Atlanta to Chattanooga over the Western and Atlantic Railroad. After this run, the General would make excursion trips on various rail lines across the eastern US through most of the 1960's. In the late 60's, the General was to go to Kennesaw for another appearance when the City of Chattanooga officials halted it. The engine was put in storage in Louisville while a legal battle for its custody ensued. In 1971 Kennesaw won custody of the engine, and it was moved there (via a route bypassing Chattanooga) in 1972 where it was placed in the Big Shanty Museum (http://www.numissociety.com/wiki/Southern_Museum_of_Civil_War_and_Locomotive_Histor y). The Texas was retired shortly after the turn of the century, and was stored on a siding. In 1911, it was moved to Grant Park and later placed in the Atlanta Cyclorama (http://www.numissociety.com/wiki/Atlanta_Cyclorama).

rzage
03-28-2012, 12:31 AM
How , did I miss this thread . Great writeup CC . Cool story Paddy .

Archaeo
04-03-2012, 08:54 PM
Some great history, and neat RR memorabilia, CC